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Time To Challange Those Trustee’s Deeds

For the past couple of years, I have been providing clients with the internal loan level accounting data, which reveals in most instances of private securitization, that all payments “due” on the notes have been paid regularly by undisclosed “co-obligors.” Thus there becomes an issue of fact as to whether or not the “note” is actually in “default.” Word through the grapevine is that this particular argument is gaining some momentum in certain jurisdictions throughout the United States.

Well now it’s time to use the same internal accounting data to attack those dubious “Trustee’s Deeds.” In non-judicial foreclosure states, a “Trustee’s Deed Upon Sale” or Trustee’s Deed” is recorded after the foreclosure sale. Often, the property is sold back to the supposed creditor into what is called “REO” status. In cases where the subject loans were alleged to have been securitized, the Trustee’s Deed will typically state that the Trustee for “XYZ Mortgage-Backed Trust” was the “highest bidder” at the sale and paid cash in the amount of $………..(whatever dollar figure.) There are many reasons to question the validity of these documents; such as the actual parties submitting the “credit bids,” and whether or not any actual cash exchanged hands as attested to under notary acknowledgment. However, there is a way to provide evidence and proof that no such payment ever exchanged hands.

The following language was extracted from a typical Trustee’s Deed:

Trustees Deed language snip

In this particular case, the alleged amount owed in the “Notice of Default” was roughly $314,000.00. A check of the internal accounting for this particular loan (6-months after the sale) shows the loan in “REO” status with no such payment having ever been applied. In fact, the certificateholders (investors) are still receiving their monthly payments of P&I with the trust showing “zero” losses.

This is good hard evidence that the sale and subsequent Trustee’s Deed filed in this case was a “sham” transaction.

If your loan was alleged to have been securitized by a private mbs trust, and your home sold in similar fashion with a recorded Trustee’s Deed, contact me today (bill.bpia@gmail.com) to see if your Trustee’s Deed matches up with the internal accounting data. I will now be offering Expert Affidavits showing what was stated in the Trustee’s Deed as opposed to what has actually occurred behind the curtains. In order to evaluate your particular trustee’s deed, I need to see it, along with a copy of the note.

It’s time to challenge those Trustee’s Deeds!

Bill Paatalo –

Private Investigator – Oregon PSID# 49411

BP Investigative Agency

4 Responsesto “Time To Challange Those Trustee’s Deeds”

  1. george trado says:

    I am in north Carolina
    sell is 4-years old can it be challenge now ?????

    • BPIA says:

      It depends on the facts. I’m not an attorney, and this isn’t legal advice, but typically the statute of limitations pertaining to issues of fraud begin when the fraud is actually discovered. I’d have to look at the sale deed and your original note at a minimum to determine if there might be something worth investigating further.

  2. jm silva says:

    where can i send more inf. to you i have 2 homes the BANK O NY. CLAIM THEY ARE THE OWNERS.

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